Call for papers instructions

XV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
Universidad San Sebastián, Bellavista

20-21 July, 2018
CALL FOR PAPERS
Closing Date: 30th APR, 2018

CPD CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT A LUXURY OR A NECESSITY?

Reminders

  • All presentations must have a length of 60 minutes maximum. We recommend you to leave 15 minutes for questions.
  • We will only receive online forms.
  • Closing date for speaker proposal forms is 30th April 2018. The google form will close on that day at 12:00 hours.
  • All presenters whose proposals are accepted will have free access to the two-day Conference, yet must reconfirm attendance.
  • The Committee’s decision is final. The applicants will be notified of their status by the beginning of June 2018 by email.
  • The Campus has Wifi available. All rooms will have a whiteboard. Any other requirement will be subject to feasibility.

XV International Conference theme

This year the conference focuses on 3 specific areas:

  • Teacher Research and Classroom Investigation
  • Classroom Management
  • Educational Technology

Ideally, your presentation needs to relate to one of them. However, you can also refer to a general CPD theme.

Parts of a Proposal

All proposals have three parts: a 10-word title, a 50-word abstract, and a 300-word session description. The title and abstract will appear in the Convention Program, but only the reviewers will see the session description. All parts of your proposal should be carefully written and proofread because they reflect the quality of your presentation.

Title

The title will:

  • Accurately reflect the content.
  • Respond to the Theme of the Conference: CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT…A LUXURY OR A NECESSITY?
  • Be clear to the intended audience.
  • Contain no more than 10 words. Each part of a slashed or hyphenated word counts as one word. Please do not use hyphens and slashes to circumvent the word count. Do not use exclamation marks or quotation marks around your title.
  • Capitalize all verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, and pronouns, no matter how many letters they have. Do not capitalize conjunctions, articles, or short prepositions of fewer than four letters. For hyphenated compounds, capitalize both words, and capitalize the first word after a colon.

Abstract

The abstract describing the session will:

  • Not exceed 50 words.
  • Not contain references to the presenter(s)’ published works or reveal the presenter(s)’ name(s).
  • Be carefully edited and proofread.
  • Be written to draw the most appropriate audience to the presentation.
  • Spell out any acronym(s) or abbreviation(s) used in the title except L1, L2, CBI, EAP, EFL, EL, ELL, ELT, ESL, ESP, IEP, SLA, TESOL, TESL, and TEFL.

Session Description

The session description will:

  • Not exceed 300 words.
  • Have a clearly stated purpose and point of view.
  • Include supporting details and examples.
  • Contain evidence of current practices and/or research.
  • Use an appropriate format (e.g., paper, demonstration).
  • Include a variety of techniques (e.g., activities, visuals).
  • Show appropriate amount of material for the allotted time.
  • Demonstrate careful editing and proofreading.
  • Not explicitly refer to the presenter(s)’ status or work.

Proposal Rating Rubric

Evaluation Criteria

Poor
1

Fair
2

Satisfactory
3

Good
4

Excellent
5

1. Currency, Importance, and Appropriateness of Topic to the Field The topic is not current, lacks importance or is not appropriate to the field. It is not a session worth attending. The topic is tangentially related to the field, not current, unimportant to the field, or unimportant to the potential audience. It is probably not a session worth attending. The topic may not be current or groundbreaking, but is relevant to the field. It might be a session worth attending. The topic is current, important and appropriate to the field. It is probably a session worth attending. The topic is cutting-edge, immediately relevant, ground-breaking, or significant to the field. It is definitely a session worth attending.
2. Purpose, Participant Outcomes, and Session Type The proposal is inappropriate for the session type, and/or the objectives are not stated, implied, or clear. The proposal may be appropriate for the session type. The objectives and participant outcomes are too general or broad to be achievable. The proposal is generally appropriate for the session type. The objectives and participant outcomes are stated or implied but may not be focused enough to guide the presentation or aid in audiences’ session selection. The proposal is appropriate for the session type. The objectives and participant outcomes are clear from the title and/or content (stated or implied), and it is clear how they will guide the presentation and aid in audiences’ session selection. The proposal matches the session type. The objectives and participant outcomes are clear from the title and content (stated or implied). Readers can envision what will be learned in the session. It contains specifics that make the reader want to learn more.
3. Motivated by Theory, Practice, and/or Research The abstract does not mention theory, practice, or research, or it is unclear how this session is connected to the field’s body of knowledge. The abstract provides background references to theory, practice, and/or research, but it is not specific, or it does not relate the theory, practice, and/or research to the content of the presentation. The abstract refers to some extent to the theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based in an understandable way and relates it to the content of the presentation. The abstract refers clearly to the theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based in a thorough and comprehensible manner and relates it directly to the presentation content. The abstract refers specifically to the appropriate theory, practice, and/or research on which the presentation is based in a detailed, thorough, and comprehensible manner and relates it directly to the presentation content.

 

4. Support for Practices, Conclusions, and/or Proposals The proposal makes claims with no indication of the support for those claims. There may be some stated or implied reference to support, but it is not clear whether sufficient support will be provided for practices, conclusions, or proposals. Some indication is given of how practices, conclusions, or proposals will be substantiated. Details are provided indicating that the practices, conclusions, or proposals will be substantiated. Details are provided indicating that the practices, conclusions, or proposals will be well substantiated.

 

5. Clarity of Proposal as Indicator of Presentation Quality The way in which the abstract is written indicates that the delivery of the presentation may be poor. The way in which the abstract is written suggests that the quality of the presentation may be weak. The abstract is adequately written but indicates that the presenter may not have a good sense of the conference audience or the quality may be uneven. The proposal abstract is clearly written and suggests that the quality of the presentation will be good. The proposal abstract is well written and indicates that the presentation will be of professional quality.

 

TOTAL SCORE = 25

 

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